1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to secondary navigation
  3. Skip to content
  4. Skip to sidebar


Primary Navigation



Business majors compete, succeed in global marketplace

Jack Harris - business students

How do American students stack up against their peers in the world market? Malone senior business students continue to find themselves at the top, thanks to a simulation activity with college participants from around the globe.

As part of the capstone experience in his Strategic Management course, Professor of Business Administration Jack Harris uses a sophisticated online simulation called “GLO-BUS” to illustrate how students can comprehensively leverage the knowledge they have acquired throughout their major coursework at Malone and apply it to real-life scenarios.

With GLO-BUS, participants are assigned a case study to run a digital camera company in head-to-head competition, starting in year six of the life of the company. They are evaluated based on board directives like growth in earnings per share and return on equity investment, as well as their ability to make ethically-responsible decisions regarding human resource, risk management, and production issues.

“I don’t teach the simulation in class,” said Harris, “rather, I teach strategy and help our students connect the dots of all the discreet content they have studied in their prerequisite coursework. Credit is due to the whole team of Malone faculty members who prepare their students to think on their feet in the real world.”

In Harris’ course, students are divided into teams of three. Recently, the team of Heath Frankland, Cory Boogaart, and Zachary Misak tied for first place out of more than 1,000 teams nationwide.

The teams compete against peers from all over the world, and their companies compete in a global market arena, selling to camera retailers in Europe-Africa, North America, Asia-Pacific, and Latin America.

Harris was notified by GLO-BUS management about the team’s elite ranking in an email that read, “You should be quite proud of your students for such an excellent performance — a performance that reflects quite well on you and the caliber of instruction that students are receiving in your course.”

“Every year our students have ranked in the top 100 overall,” said Harris. “I am proud of these successes because they are tangible reminders of the value of a Malone education.”



OmniUpdate