Home / News and Events / News Release

Third Annual Undergraduate Student Research Symposium

The Third Annual Malone University Undergraduate Research Symposium: A Festival of Student Achievement -- Wednesday, March 30 from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. in the Brehme Conference Center. The event is free and open to the public.

The Malone University Research Symposium showcases the creative and academic scholarship of Malone undergraduate students.  The primary mode of presentation will be the academic poster.  Student self-designed poster presentations will be displayed throughout the Brehme Conference Center and student researchers will be on hand to answer questions. Hors d’oeuvres will be served.

Some examples of participating students and areas of scholarship include:

Reina Allbritain, a junior English major from Canton
China Dolls: Excerpts from Missionary Journals
Faculty mentor: Jacci Welling, Ph.D., associate professor of history

 Jonathan Angel, a senior zoo biology major from New Philadelphia
Bovine Ruminal Acidosis: Effects on Various Parameters Including: Milk Production and Milk Fat
Faculty mentor: Nicholette Rogers, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology

Ben Phipps, a senior Bible and theology major from Rockwood, Penn. 
Christian Vocation and the Old Testament: distinctions between "ordinary" and "extraordinary" calling in three Old Testament texts
Faculty mentor: D. Nathan Phinney, Ph.D., associate professor of biblical studies

Zachary Taylor, a senior mathematics major from Pittsfield, Penn.
Elliptic Curves: A Smooth Way Of Integer Factorization
Faculty mentor: David Hahn, Ph.D., chair, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, professor of mathematics 

Kevin Embleton, a senior music ministry major from Hartville
The Show Has Just Begun: This project deals with the Japanese music industry. Aside from how digitalization has affected the industry, there are several unique aspects to Japan's outlook on entertainment.
Faculty mentor: Jacci Welling, Ph.D., associate professor of history

Andrew Preston, 2010 graduate with a bachelor’s degree in history, currently residing in Canton
Chicken on the Cheap: The Development and Impact of the American Broiler Industry
Faculty mentor: Geoffrey Bowden, Ph.D., associate professor of political science

 Katie Nixon, a senior nursing major from Waynesburg
Perception of infant and toddler development of young pregnant women
Susan McDevitt MSN, RN, instructor of nursing

James  M. Wojdacz, a junior business administration major from North Ridgeville;
Amanda C. Buckhannon, a junior business administration major from Canton;
Terry L. Rosenberg, a junior business administration major from Hanoverton
Serenity Springs: Best Kept Secret:
Reinbows @ Serenity Springs Equine Center, located in East Canton, is a non-profit organization that specializes in Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP). 
Faculty mentor: Maria Lam, Ph.D., professor of business administration

James K. Cooperider, a junior business administration major from Massillon;
Brittney A. Schweizer, a junior business administration major from Canton;
Brittany N. Cook, a senior business administration major from Norton
Reinbows @ Serenity Springs: 
Research objectives: find a marketing segment for Reinbows and successfully market its therapy.
Faculty mentor: Maria Lam, Ph.D., professor of business administration

Paul Henderson, a senior political science major from Hudson;
KC Carter, a junior music production major from Oak Park, IL;
Bryan K. Bayer, a senior businesa dminstration major from Navarre;
Gabrielle S. Wuensch, a senior art major from New London
Marketing Strategy Analysis and New Strategy Implementation for Camp Burton
Faculty mentor: Maria Lam, Ph.D., professor of business administration

Natalie Shilling, a senior business administration major from Wooster;
Anthony Body, a senior business administration major from Cleveland;
Timothy Root, a senior music production major from Springs, Penn.
Marketing Strategy for Camp Burton
Faculty mentor: Maria Lam, Ph.D., professor of business administration

According to Spencer Rennels, a junior music production major from North Granby, CT, “The most exciting part of this research project has been really digging in to the work and being genuinely interested in what I was doing.  I really enjoy being able to create something that is my own…and have several opportunities to present it.”

Senior nursing major from Beaver, Penn., Kiera Holbein agrees. “I truly enjoyed my research experience, through planning the project, actually performing the project and meeting with participants, to then analyzing my results. I felt that the experience not only helped me to grow as a student, but also as a person…”

University faculty members see the benefit of student research as well.

According to Maria Lam, Ph.D., professor of business administration, “Many business principles can be very evasive if the context is not addressed. When students do research, they can learn how to appreciate other people’s research findings, know how to use them in their projects, and develop confidence in solving managerial problems in the future. I think it is important for students to learn how to learn, to practice to be responsible leaders, and to apply what they learn in a specific context.”

Beth Clark Thomas, Ph.D., professor of elementary education, adds, “In our discipline action research is an intentional element of daily instruction.  Designing meaningful instruction depends upon pre-assessing student learning aligned with specific goals/standards, reflecting on that baseline data, then designing appropriate interventions to assist the learners in reaching their full potential.  Each assessment, formal and informal, informs subsequent instruction.  Learning about how to study student learning and results of instruction on learning must be practiced across a variety of contexts within varied school settings before a beginning teacher will have the confidence and competence to embark on their own.  UR provides teacher candidates the opportunity for that meaningful practice.”